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Wednesday, August 12, 2020 | History

1 edition of Historical Aspects of Transcatheter Occlusion of Atrial Septal Defects found in the catalog.

Historical Aspects of Transcatheter Occlusion of Atrial Septal Defects

by Srilatha Alapati

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Published by INTECH Open Access Publisher .
Written in


Edition Notes

En.

ContributionsP. Syamasundar Rao, author
The Physical Object
Pagination1 online resource
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL27019015M
ISBN 109535105310
ISBN 109789535105312
OCLC/WorldCa884222833

  Adult patients with atrial septal defect (ASD) and pulmonary hypertension represent a more advanced degree of disease, all having prolonged left-to-right shunt that may induce pulmonary vascular changes and functional limitations over a certain age.1, 2 Percutaneous device occlusion of secundum ASD is an accepted alternative to surgical closure. The increasing experience allows adult . Atrial Septal Defect. Percutaneous transcatheter atrial septal defect (ASD) closure is a reasonable alternative to surgical repair and is often preferred in patients with .

Atrial septal defect transcatheter occlusion techniques have become an alternative to surgical procedures. A number of different devices are available for transcatheter ASD closure.   A feasibility clinical study was conducted for the transcatheter occlusion of large ostium secundum atrial septal defects with the centering buttoned device. The centering buttoned device is a modification of the regular buttoned device in which a centering counter-occluder is sutured at the central 40% portion of the occluder.

Introduction: Although multiple defects of the atrial septum are not uncommon, there remain limited data regarding the use of multiple devices in these patients. A variety of approaches to transcatheter closure have been used, and in this paper we describe the experience from two operators in a single centre. Methods: From September to September , transcatheter atrial septal. Transcatheter Occlusion of Atrial Septal Defects for Prevention of Recurrence of Paradoxical Embolism. By Nicoleta Daraban, Manuel Reyes and Richard W. Smalling. Submitted: October 25th Reviewed: March 14th Published: April 25th DOI: /


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Historical Aspects of Transcatheter Occlusion of Atrial Septal Defects by Srilatha Alapati Download PDF EPUB FB2

Historical Aspects of Transcatheter Occlusion of Atrial Septal Defects 75 TEE studies showed a residual shunt in % af ter 60 days in patients with PFO and a left. Historical Aspects of Transcatheter Occlusion of Atrial Septal Defects.

By Srilatha Alapati and P. Syamasundar Rao. Submitted: July 31st Reviewed: February 29th Published: April 25th DOI: /Cited by: 4. Historical Aspects of Transcatheter Occlusion of Atrial Septal Defects 59 Rashkind’s devices Rashkind developed a slightly different type of ASD closure device.

Atrial septal defect (ASD) is one of the most common congenital heart diseases (CHD) in children and adults. This group of malformations includes several types of atrial communications allowing shunting of blood between the systemic and the pulmonary circulations.

Early diagnosis and treatment carries favorable : Wail Alkashkari, Saad Albugami, Ziyad M. Hijazi. Historical Aspects of Transcatheter Occlusion of Atrial Septal Defects. By Srilatha Alapati and P. Syamasundar Rao.

Open access peer-reviewed. Role of Transesophageal Echocardiography in Transcatheter Occlusion of Atrial Septal Defects. By Gurur Author: Shankar Sridharan, Gemma Price, Oliver Tann, Marina Hughes, Vivek Muthurangu, Andrew M.

Taylor. Download Citation | History of the Development of Atrial Septal Occlusion Devices. | In this review, historical developments related to transcatheter occlusion of atrial septal defects (ASDs) are.

Atrial septal occlusion devices are implantable cardiac devices used in patients with certain types of atrial septal defects.

They are used in cases of atrial septal defects with right atrial or ventricle enlargement, to prevent paradoxical embolism, left-to-right shunting and platypnea-orthodeoxia syndrome r, only secundum atrial septal defects are suitable for closure with such.

Historical Aspects of Transcatheter Treatment of Heart Disease in Children as well as covered stents; 3. transcatheter occlusion of cardiac defects comprising of atrial septal defect, patent foramen ovale, patent ductus arteriosus, ventricular septal defect and.

Historical Aspects of Transcatheter Occlusion of Atrial Septal Defect Atrial Septal Defect. – [ Google Scholar ] [3] Pillai AA, Satheesh S, Pakkirisamy G, et al. Techniques and outcomes of transcatheter closure of complex atrial septal defects e Single center experience. Introduction.

Atrial septal defect (ASD) and patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) are both common congenital heart diseases, but the combination of these two common cardiac defects is extremely rare.1–3 Transcatheter closure of these defects is widely accepted as an alternative to surgical closure. Previously, we reported a rare case of an adult patient with both ASD and PDA and.

transcatheter occlusion of atrial septal defect or patent foramen ovale with right-to- left shunting associated with previously operated complex congenital cardiac anomalies, Am J Cardiol, Vol. Sixteen patients had larger defects with right heart dilatation, while the primary indication for closure in four was a history of early paradoxical embolism.

INTERVENTIONS—Transcatheter atrial septal defect occlusions performed under transoesophageal echocardiography and fluoroscopic guidance between December and June   Ventricular septal defect was the most common congenital heart disease, followed by secundum atrial septal defect (ASD).

The reported prevalence of secundum ASD was per live births. There are four kinds of ASD, including primum, secundum, sinus venosus and. The atrial septal defect (ASD) is one of the most common congenital heart defects, occurring in approximately 1 in live births.

1 Transcatheter occlusion (TCO) of ASD is a safe, effective alternative to traditional surgical closure, 2 with many favorable merits, including superior cosmetic results, less trauma, avoidance of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB), and a shorter hospital.

BACKGROUND Despite two decades of research, a transcatheter atrial septal defect closure device is not available for clinical use. We have designed a new superelastic Nitinol-Dacron, double-disk, self-centering, atrial septal defect closure device and studied its efficacy in a canine model of atrial septal defects.

METHODS AND RESULTS Atrial septal defects were created surgically in 20 adult. Sixteen patients had larger defects with right heart dilatation, while the primary indication for closure in four was a history of early paradoxical embolism.

INTERVENTIONS Transcatheter atrial septal defect occlusions performed under transoesophageal echocardiography and fluoroscopic guidance between December and June Transcatheter occlusion of patent ductus arteriosus with adjustable buttoned device.

Initial clinical experience. Circulation. Sep; 88 (3)– Sideris EB, Sideris SE, Thanopoulos BD, Ehly RL, Fowlkes JP. Transvenous atrial septal defect occlusion by the buttoned device. Am J Cardiol. Dec 15; 66 (20)– The increased diagnostic accuracy of 2D and color Doppler echocardiography enables surgical closure of atrial septal defects without routine preoperative cardiac catheterization.

1 2 However, with the introduction of new transcatheter methods for interventional defect closure, 3 4 5 cardiac catheterization in patients with atrial septal defects has experienced a renaissance.

Atrial septal abnormalities are common congenital lesions remaining asymptomatic until adulthood in a great number of patients. The most frequent atrial septal defects in adults are ostium secundum atrial septal defect (ASD) and patent foramen ovale (PFO), both approachable by transcatheter closure using device implantation.

INTRODUCTION. Transcatheter closure of secundum atrial septal defect (ASD) has gained wide acceptance due to excellent success rates and low risk [1–4].There are, however, certain anatomical aspects, including defect size and position in the atrial septum that render some ASDs more difficult to close and more susceptible to complications.

Background: Transcatheter atrial septal defect (ASD) closure in the dog was first reported in Objectives: Describe the technique and both short- and mid-term outcome of transcatheter ASD closure with the Amp-latzers atrial septal occluder (ASO).

Animals: Thirteen client-owned dogs with ASD.The purpose of this presentation is to report the progress of two interventional catheter techniques that have occupied my attention for the last 10 years; namely, transcatheter patent ductus arteriosus occlusion and patch atrial septal defect closure.

A brief survey of the aspects of interventional cardiology, including its past, present and.Current practice in atrial septal defect occlusion in children and adults.

This article intended to review all aspects of ASD; anatomy, pathophysiology, clinical presentation, natural history, and indication for treatment. Also, we covered the transcatheter therapy in detail, including the procedural aspect, available devices, and outcomes.